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Not since the 1990’s film Waterworld has the high seas been so treacherous. Freedom of the seas was an issue that was hotly debated prior to World War I but recently hasn’t been an area of concern unless you happen to be a Somali Pirate (btw, Somali “Pirates” as we like to call them, are actually considered by Somalians as their only military: The Somali Coast Guard. Get educated and read about their side of the story). Garrrr! Woodrow Wilson was the first to champion the idea back when he proposed his 14 Points following the Great War. His concern stemmed from unrestricted U-boat attacks all across the Atlantic during the war. Now almost 100 years later the United Nations will be forced to revisit this issue!

Just recently the United States has been criticized for attacking a small vessel off the coast of Dubai, U.A.E. that disregarded warnings to alter its course. The USNV Rappahannok, an oil transport ship, fired its .50 caliber gun at the U.A.E. ship killing one of the passengers and injuring three more as reported by the US Consulate in Abu Dhabi.

Following the attack on the USS Cole, the United States has had little patience in dealing with potential terrorist threats. With the flammable nature of the USNV Rappahannok’s cargo, many experts claim that the US was justified in deterring this potential threat. Critics however question the decision of the crew especially after the recent heightening of tensions in the region with Iran’s threat to close the Straight of Hormuz. Regardless the actions of United States Navy threaten to disrupt the fragile peace which exists in the Persian Gulf currently.

Was the US justified in its actions off of the coast of Dubai?

How would you argue about the dangers for sending any ship through the Middle East portal that connects the East and West Hemispheres?

What dangers do the economies of the modern world face if cargo traveling through the Suez canal is always at considerable risk while en route?

Let us know what you think and comment below!

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